Inclusive Mainstream Publications

Each place on the list has been recommended by at least one disabled/neurodivergent writer.  We are passing these on in good faith, mistakes may be made.  If you have reason to believe a publication shouldn't be included, please let us know.

Notes:  Most places use Submittable unless stated.
We've opted NOT to include places where you pay to submit (for regular submissions).
We will indicate pay rates where we can find them.

We tried to avoid websites that would trigger migraines and/or seizures.  But, since we do not have those conditions ourselves, we can't be absolutely positive we've avoided this entirely.
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Literary Journals, Periodicals, etc.


1.  Typo Magazine publishes poetry in an online magazine.  Established 2003. Based in Fayetteville, Arkansas/Springfield, Illinois.

2.  The Rumpus  From the Website:  "At The Rumpus, we’ve got essays, reviews, interviews, music, film, fiction, and poetry—along with some kick-ass comics. We know how easy it is to find pop culture on the Internet, so we’re here to give you something more challenging, to show you how beautiful things are when you step off the beaten path."  

3.  DIALOGIST publishes poetry and visual art.  Submit only once every 90 days.  From the Website:   "DIALOGIST is an online platform for diversity through discourse. Be clear. Be dynamic. Start a conversation."

4.  The Establishment takes op-eds, personal essays, and investigative pieces.  Pays $125 per accepted piece, more for the longer, investigative stuff.

5.  Denver Quarterly fiction, creative non-fiction, hybrid genre work, poetry, reviews, interviews, and translations.  Submittable and postal mail submissions accepted.

6.  Poetry Magazine considers poetry and reviews of poetry books (and other poetry-related prose).  Pays $300 minimum for poetry, $150 per page of prose.  They accept submissions all year long.

7.  Ghost Ocean wants poetry and short fiction (including flash fiction).  Submissions are taken year-round, though they do put certain submission categories on hold, occasionally.  From the Website:  "Founded in Chicago in 2010, Ghost Ocean is an award-winning literary magazine whose work has been reprinted in Best of the Net, Pushcart Prize: Best of the Small Presses, Fiction Daily, and has been shortlisted for the Wigleaf Top 50."

8.  Copper Nickel wants translation folios, fiction, essays, and poetry. They are open from August 15th to April 15th. Pays $30 per page, contributors' copies, and a one-year subscription.  A Note on pay:  Per-page payment could vary slightly from year to year, based on funding.

9.  Beecher's Magazine considers poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.  Their "general" submission reading period (for 2017, closed in late January).  They give contributors a copy of the issue in which their work appears.

10.  Lunch Ticket From the website:  "Lunch Ticket and Amuse-Bouche both publish Poetry, Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Flash Prose (any genre), Young Adult (13+), Literary Translation & Multilingual Texts, and Visual Art (painting, drawing, photography, printmaking, sculpture, installation, mixed-media, graphic narratives, and other 2D work)."  Reading periods:  February 1st to April 30th and August 1st to October 31st.

11.  Tin House welcomes unsolicited submissions of poetry, short stories, and essays during March and September.  They have themed issues, as well as issues with no theme (check their website for upcoming topics).  Multiple sources say they pay writers, but no specifics.

12.  MUZZLE poetry, book reviews, and interviews (seemingly focused on poets and poetry).  They also consider poetry collections (electronically) for review.  Submissions closed from December 15th to January 15th.

13.  The Iowa Review considers unsolicited submissions in September, October, and November only.  They charge a fee for online submissions, but not paper ones (which is why it is included here).  From the website:  The Iowa Review publishes short stories, flash fiction, graphic novels, self-contained novel excerpts, and plays; poetry of all kinds; and all manner of creative nonfiction, including personal essays, lyric essays, memoirs, and literary journalism. The page limit for prose is 25 pages and for poetry is 8 pages (query by e-mail if you have a longer poem). We pay $1.50 per line for poetry ($40 minimum) and $0.08 per word for prose ($100 minimum).  They also take translations.

14.  Glass: A Journal of Poetry seeks poetry in every month but March and April.  They also have a poetry chapbook press which is also free to submit to (it takes submissions in March).

15.  The Binnacle accepts fiction and poetry (mostly).  From December 1st to March 15th, submissions are accepted for the Annual International Ultra-Short Competition (their Fall issue); winners get paid and there is no fee (honorable mentions receive publication).  They read from September 1st to November 30th for their Spring issue, which has no mention of payment.

16.  Black Fox Literary Magazine wants fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, blog posts, and visual art.  They read on an ongoing basis, but have dates where they read for specific issues.  It is published in print and online.

17.  Paper Nautilus considers poetry, fiction, aphorisms, and cover art from February 15th to June 15th.  Contributors receive a copy of the issue their work appears in.

18.  Banshee Literary Journal (or just Banshee) publishes short stories, flash fiction, essays and poetry from Ireland and around the globe.  Has unspecified reading periods, check website.  Send submissions by Email.  Note on pay from the website:  "We believe in paying writers. We can offer contributors a small fee as well as two copies of the journal."

19.  Outlook Springs seeks literary fiction, poetry, and non-fiction "tinged with the strange".  Reading periods:  March 15th to July 15th and September 15th to January 15th. A note on pay from their Submittable:  "For fiction and non-fiction, contributors will be paid $25 in addition to a contributor's copy. Poets will be paid $10 per poem in addition to one contributor's copy total."

20.  The Mondegreen is an online literary magazine publishing fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, reviews, and category-defying work.  From the editor/website:  "A mondegreen is a kind of misunderstanding: you mishear a word or phrase in a way that gives it a different meaning. In naming this project after a mistake, we don’t mean to say that we want your error-riddled, hastily shot-off drivel, but we do want the work that isn’t afraid of being wrong. We want something that we can’t quite recognize, but which feels uncannily familiar. We want to get spooked by it or laugh or maybe both. All of that."

21. Hermeneutic Chaos Literary Journal is an online journal seeking poetry, fiction, and artwork.  They nominate for certain awards and want "beautifully crafted narrative mindscapes that move us with their linguistic, emotional expanse and powerful imagery".  They also have a chapbook press.

22.  District Lit is an online literary journal that publishes poetry, prose, and art on a rolling basis.  From the website:  "Our vision is an online community in which we present the stories that writers want to tell and that readers want to read. We are here to publish writing that smashes down the borders we use to district our lives, and we hope you find something that changes your world."

23.  Luna, Luna "is an online diary and community interested in art, feminism, literature, opinion, sex and the occult."  They consider many things, including unexpected items like diaries, videos, round-ups, lists, etc.  Submit via email.

24.  Black Napkin Press is an online literary magazine that wants poetry and art.  From the Website:  "We like poetry that carries an ache (even a joyful one), poetry that punches you in the heart and leaves you with the taste of blood on your teeth."

25.  Women's eNews "is an award-winning nonprofit news service covering issues of particular concern to women and providing women’s perspectives on public policy."  They take pitches (along with a writing sample and résumé) via email.

26.  Teen Vogue takes articles from freelancers. Send pitches and writing samples to Melanie_Mignucci@condenast.com (I can't easily locate writer's guidelines so, email with your questions).

27.  Magma Poetry Magazine wants poetry.  Each issue has a different guest editor and is published three times a year.  It is published out of the UK.  Contributors get a copy.

28.  Crab Fat Magazine needs submissions of poetry, fiction (including flash), creative nonfiction, visual art, and reviews of books from small presses.  They publish eleven issues online with an annual print anthology.  From the website:  "...frank language is always the best, even if that means using profanity and non-standard English. Break away from traditional structures and mainstream ideologies. Emotive writing is most important."

29.  Polychrome Ink is a platform for marginalized writers and their works.  They seek fiction and creative nonfiction in various lengths, poetry, and reprints.  Pays:  Flash fiction, short nonfiction, and essays are $15.  Poetry is $25 per poem.  Long Fiction, nonfiction, and essays are $40 each.  Reprints are paid half the amount of original content.

30.  Cosmonauts Avenue publishes online and needs fiction, nonfiction, poetry, reviews, and comics.  From the Website:  "We want to elevate underrepresented voices and include a wide range of identities and experiences. We want work that pays careful attention to craft while remaining urgent and surprising."

31.  The Huffington Post wants your blog pitches.  From the website:  "Feel free to pitch any topic you like. We're always looking for posts that are succinct, shareable and satisfying." 

32.  BuzzFeed READER takes personal essays and cultural criticism pieces.  They pay, but don't list specifics.

33.  BODY is an international online literary journal seeking poetry, translations, art interviews, fiction, essays, reviews, and idea pieces.  They publish work on a rolling basis.

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Speculative Magazines


1.  Strange Horizons wants art, fiction, nonfiction, reviews, poetry, and even podcast readers.  They are open to every genre "speculative" encompasses.  Payment varies by type of piece accepted, check guidelines.  Submissions are accepted via Email and they do not allow simultaneous submissions.

2.  Devilfish Review considers poetry, short stories, flash fiction, and nonfiction.  They look for all genres under the "speculative umbrella", but won't reject the right "literary" piece.  They have no set reading periods, though certain categories will close on occasion.  Payment is $10, regardless of length or type of piece.

3. Star*Line considers poetry, art, and nonfiction.  It is the official newsletter of the Science Fiction Poetry Association.  Email submissions are strongly preferred over regular mail. They are open year-round.  Payment varies depending on type of submission, check their guidelines for details.

4. Kaleidotrope accepts poetry, fiction, art, and nonfiction.  Check the website for current reading periods.  Submissions should be sent via email.  Note on payment from the website:  "For fiction and nonfiction alike, we will pay $0.01/word (1 cent a word) USD. For poetry, we offer a flat rate of $5 USD per accepted piece; for artwork, $40 ($60 for cover art)."

5. Veil: Journal of Darker Musings considers poetry.  They accept submissions only via Email.  Note from the website: "We publish poems on a variety of frisson-inducing subjects. We like the occasional darkly humorous poem, as well as more serious and thoughtful work."  Contributors receive a copy of the issue in which their work appears.

6. Polu Texni accepts fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and book reviews.  They prefer sci-fi and fantasy themes (horror is absent from the guidelines).  Submissions are accepted via Email.  They pay 3-5 cents a word on everything but poetry.  Poetry is $20 per poem.

7. Arsenika wants poetry, fiction, and "reprint art".  "Arsenika looks for gorgeous, emotional writing: poetry that shimmers with multiple layers of meaning, prose that explores and interrogates."  Strongly prefers speculative genres.  Submissions are accepted via Email.  They pay $60 for fiction, $30 for poetry, and $100 for reprint art.

8. VOICES "is a quarterly literary magazine, featuring speculative fiction from writers who come from historically marginilised backgrounds." They are not open until October of 2017.  No other genre but fiction is listed anywhere on the site.

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